You’ve not lived as an Xbox racing fan until you try the very best Xbox One steering wheels. They reinvent what it feels as though to drive on an electronic track via pedals, more realistic feedback, and lifelike resistance as you tear around corners. In a nutshell, they’re many of the most essential Xbox One accessories you can aquire the hands on.

However, that comes at an extremely literal cost – Xbox One steering wheels could be expensive, regardless if you’re wise and choose the cheaper bundles with pedals included. There’s lots of fancy tech beneath the hood, in the end (up to ‘force feedback’, which gives a far more immersive experience). That is why we’ve rustled up as much deals as easy for our tips below. These offers are updated every day to provide maximum affordability, leaving you with cash left for other things you should improve your racing experience – the very best gaming chairs or the very best gaming desks, for instance.

No matter what you select, you may never want to use standard controllers for racing again!

Best Xbox One steering wheels

(Image credit: Logitech)

  1. Logitech G923 tyre & pedals
    Most likely the best value-for-money set-up in the marketplace

Rotation: 900° | Buttons: 16 | Pedals: 3 | Adjustable Pedals: No

Less expensive than direct competitors

TrueForce feels insane

G Hub Software is brilliant

TrueForce only appropriate for four games

No handbrake input and stick shift not included

Logitech has been around the tyre industry for around 2 decades now and as gaming technology has improved, so gets the quality of their wheels. The G923 is a primary successor to both Xbox-focused G920, and the PS version, the G29. Now we’ve just got that one device sold in two variants, and boy oh boy could it be a corker.

Steering wheels are usually targeted at either entry-level players seeking to dip their toes in the water of sim racing, or hardcore racers who’ve been doing this for quite a while now and the G923 attracts both brilliantly. The G923 offers possibly the most immersion you’ll receive from any wheel that you can buy thanks to the brand new TrueForce technology, while still keeping the purchase price point below the upmarket costs. A cost of £350/$400 continues to be steep if you’re not used to the scene, but it’s significantly less than its direct opponents and is one of the better with regards to performance. It’s well-built with premium stitching around the leather, looks sleek together with your set-up, and may be the closest you will get to see what it’s prefer to actually be when driving of a supercar/F1 car/rally car without leaving the comfort of your desk – or forking out some serious money for a complete sim-rig set-up. If you the money, the G923 is a lovely little bit of kit, and a must-have unless you already own an identical product.

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(Image credit: Logitech)

  1. Logitech G920
    The very best overall Xbox One tyre

Wheel rotation: 900º | Pedals: 3 | Buttons: 13 | Adjustable pedals: Yes

An excellent wheel at an excellent price

Feels great to operate a vehicle with

Bespoke for Xbox One

Pedals certainly are a little stiff to get started on with

If you want the very best all-round Xbox One tyre, that is it – it includes excellent control for the purchase price. Sure, it’s not the least expensive. But you won’t leave disappointed. As we mention inside our full Logitech G920 review, this one’s first got it where it counts.

The Force Feedback in the Logitech wheel is exemplary, with strong, smooth forces pushing and pulling against the hands as you control the automobile. It feels slightly smoother to use compared to the Thrustmaster TX, but also just a little less realistic. It is rather much a deluxe game controller instead of a replica of a genuine steering wheel setup. It isn’t so strong that you will need to physically wrestle with the automobile as with the Fanatec servos, but you will still feel the steering go light when you understeer, clatter across kerbs and feel cars rubbing against you in tight packs. Lovely stuff.

This is an extremely comfortable wheel to really hold, but isn’t interchangeable like other similarly-priced units, so you’re stuck with the main one in the box. That’s really no bad thing, though – the paddle shifters feel nice, the fatter rim than other wheels feels really nice to carry and increases the smooth sensation of driving, and the buttons’ raised up profiling produces a wheel that’s both stylish and practical for gaming.

This is the only downside to the machine. The machine we tested had an extremely stiff brake pedal from new, which meant that applying 100% braking was tough without sitting on the pedal with your entire weight. The problem apparently lies with the rubber stopper that’s intended to offer you a realistic feel of resistance, nonetheless it appears that some units’ rubber is too much. It really is modified, and can get better as time passes, however the fact remains that other units offer more playable experience straight from the box. Still, assuming you will get the brakes working well, all of those other unit is a bargain as of this price, taking into consideration the product you’re getting.

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(Image credit: Thrustmaster)

  1. Thrustmaster Ferrari 458 Spider
    The very best budget Xbox One tyre

Rotation: 240º | Pedals: 2 | Buttons: 15 | Adjustable pedals: Yes

Relatively cheap

Offers decent control

Rotation isn’t nearly as good

Doesn’t feel as satisfying to use

This can be the budget end of the number, but it’s still far, far better-feeling for driving games when compared to a pad because you get yourself a wheel and pedals for progressive steering and brake/throttle inputs. Remember, it’s more suitable for everyday arcade racers than true sims (though it’ll be plenty of fun with Forza).

The main thing this is what the machine lacks, and that’s Force Feedback. There’s ‘linear resistance’ on the tyre, this means it gets harder to carefully turn the more you transform it. That’s fair enough, but instead of a motor feeding back what’s happening in the overall game through the hands, this is merely a straightforward bungee cord it doesn’t translate the action into extra movement. It is also worth noting that the wheel doesn’t rotate as much between full locks, this means less precision (but also more responsive steering in comparison to your movements). Less realistic, but better for arcade racing games.

The wheel feels less solid and realistic because of this, although since it’s modelled on a genuine Ferrari wheel, at least the look is suitably racy and comfortable. It too has long-pronged paddle shifters, in order to change gear together with your fingertips when you race, exactly like real racing drivers.

Again, as the brake pedal here offers progressive input, but that is a far more cheaply-made pedal set than others upon this list, and you may feel the difference. However the fact remains that controlling brakes and acceleration together with your feet rather than triggers on a pad rocks !, so if you wish to feel just like a racing driver when you play your favourite racing games, this can do the job well.

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(Image credit: Thrustmaster)

  1. Thrustmaster TMX
    The very best mid-range Xbox One tyre

Wheel rotation: 900º | Pedals: up to 3 – sold separately | Buttons: 12 | Adjustable pedals: Yes

Great price

Lovely force feedback

Cheap-feeling pedals with the essential version

Much less solid as others

Here is the entry-level Force Feedback wheel for Xbox One, but it doesn’t mean a disappointing experience – definately not it. It actually means you get the feel of an arcade cabinet at home, access to advanced functions in your racing games which were previously denied for you, and you get yourself a feel for what it’s enjoy to drive an automobile.

Obviously the standard of the servo this is a far cry from the top-of-the-range products elsewhere upon this list, nevertheless, you so get forces pushing and pulling at the wheel as you race. There is nothing quite so exciting as seeing another car moving in your direction and feeling the nudge through the hands as you drive – it’s just like the game is really happening. Games nowadays have a whole lot of detail within their Force Feedback systems, so most of the quality regarding how good the result is comes from the program, instead of the hardware. And since Thrustmaster is a respected brand, even their entry-level gear will probably be worth playing.

The layout of the wheel is very like the Leather Racing Edition of the top-tier model, which is correctly functional, but does not have buttons easy to get at under your thumbs – you do have to grab them. When which means your handbrake isn’t easy and simple button to press – in particular when you’re turning the wheel already – that isn’t ideal. However, it’s a good and otherwise pleasant-feeling design, and the long-pronged paddle shifters means you may easily change gear whether you possess your wheel at the 10-to-two position, or the racier quarter-to-three. It likely won’t take as a lot of a beating as more costly wheels, but if you drive smoothly, it’ll last perfectly indeed.

Not good, sadly. A decent pedal unit needs metal and a clutch pedal, but that is a plasticky, two-pedal affair. It still enables you to input throttle and brake controls at varying degrees, this means you’re not as likely to lock the wheels under braking, or spin the wheels of the startline. It’s still way, way much better than by using a standard control pad (though Xbox One’s haptic triggers are pretty wonderful at doing those same tasks), so controlling the overall game won’t be a concern. Just don’t expect it to feel just like there’s a genuine car under your feet – there plainly isn’t.